500 Miles From Galveston TX

Caribbean

(Click on image to view photo album in Flickr)

These here are a few photos from our June trip from Galveston Texas to Cozumel Mexico, Georgetown Grand Cayman, and Falmouth Jamaica. Missing are the pictures that I took with the disposable waterproof camera from when we went snorkeling. They aren’t any good. They do however have sentimental value and are hidden away in the archives of the desktop, including over half that have what appear to be a finger over the lens. Not a good snorkeler, which translates to the quality of photos that were taken while snorkeling/drowning.

Also not included are the fogged-up lens photos. I have never experienced weather so muggy that it affects the lens of the camera. Several of the photos that I took at each port, including Galveston Texas, came out foggy.

The trip coincided with a mild tropical storm, Cindy, which formed off the coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. The ocean was never completely calm, and there were brief periods of over 10 foot swells and lighting. While driving around Cozumel with out taxi driver Guillermo, we did run into a few heavy downpours, but that seemed to be the extent of it.

Overall, the trip was excelente and I was sad when it ended. It is always nice to return home, but we will be back. Oh yes, we will be back!

Cape Disappointment/ Fort Stevens

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Cape Disappointment

“The coast in the neighbourhood of Clarks Mountain is sliping off & falling into the Ocean in immence masses; fifty or a hundred Acres at a time give way and a great proportion in an instant precipitated into the Ocean.    these hills and mountains are principally composed of a yellow clay; there sliping off or spliting assunder at this time is no doubt caused by the incessant rains which have fallen within the last two months.”  – Meriwether Lewis, January 10, 1806 (Original Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, 1804-1806

A sign at the bottom of the hill where this picture was taken at Cape Disappointment Washington mentions the resemblance that it has to William Clark’s journal description during the Corps of Discovery’s stay in Oregon. The hill is now a significant distance in yards from the ocean, but in 1806, before erosion, it would have been situated next to the ocean with the waves crashing against it.

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